5 Christian Sites in Jerusalem You Should Know About

Jerusalem is famous for the standard sites tourists visit. The Western Wall, the Temple Mount, the Holocaust Museum, and the Israel Museum top the list of many visitors to Jerusalem.

5 Christian Sites in Jerusalem You Should Know About

(Photo: Sunrise over the Holy City of Jerusalem. Courtesy of the Pictorial Library of Bible Lands)

Pilgrims, sightseers, and worshippers from three major religions journey to the Holy City every year. Because Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, all see Jerusalem as a Holy City, it’s tough to designate many of the Christian sites in Jerusalem as distinctly Christian.

After all, Christianity has its roots in the faith of the ancient Hebrews. Jesus was a Jew, and so, many Jewish sites are therefore also connected to Christianity.

Even still, I have selected ten Christian sites in Jerusalem that have a direct, historical connection to the ministry of Jesus.

In this post, I’ll share with you the first five of these Christian sites in Jerusalem.

The Temple Mount—An Ordinary Hill Made Holy

Abraham saw the acreage. David bought the lot. Solomon built the house. Nebuchadnezzar tore it town. Zerubbabel rebuilt it. Herod the Great expanded it. Titus flattened it.

Before these temples stood on Mount Moriah, it was nothing but a hill used for threshing wheat. Hardly worth noticing.

The Temple Mount—An Ordinary Hill Made Holy

(Photo: the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, courtesy of Pictorial Library of Bible Lands)

But today, the Temple Mount remains the most precious piece of real estate in the world. And the golden shrine that graces its crest has become the icon for the Holy City of Jerusalem itself.

How did this ordinary hill become holy? Not through battles or land bartering or by popular vote.

God chose it.

The 4 Quarters of Jerusalem United One Day?

Whenever I visit the ancient Cardo street in Jerusalem, I like to look at the replica of the Medeba Map mosaic.

It depicts the Holy Land as it looked in AD 580 and shows Jerusalem sectioned by crossroads. The divisions paved the way for the four quarters of today.

Medeba Map replica in Jerusalem

(Photo: Replica of the Medeba Map mosaic, showing the Cardo street. The Greek letters read: “Holy City of Jerusalem”)

The annual celebration of Jerusalem Day, or Yom Yerushalayim, reminds me of the T-shirt my grandmother bought me when she went to Jerusalem in 1987. I think I still have the shirt. (Some of us men keep clothes way too long.)

Printed in English, Hebrew and Arabic, the shirt celebrated “The 20th Anniversary of the Reunification of Jerusalem.” But can we really call the city unified?